Search
CTisus CT Scanning CTisus CT Scanning CTisus CT Scanning CTisus CT Scanning CTisus CT Scanning CTisus CT Scanning CTisus CT Scanning CTisus CT Scanning CTisus CT Scanning Ask the Fish

Everything you need to know about Computed Tomography (CT) & CT Scanning

Practice Management: Patient Care Imaging Pearls - Educational Tools | CT Scanning | CT Imaging | CT Scan Protocols - CTisus
Imaging Pearls ❯ Practice Management ❯ Patient Care

-- OR --

  • All too often, people ignore my advice by saying that “our industry is different, and what you have to teach me doesn’t hold true for us.” Let me assure you, however, that our industries are not so very different, and that we both share a primary goal of serving the customer. Your department may be composed of some of the best physicians in the world, and you may know more about medicine than some of your competitors, but that doesn’t necessarily matter.
    The pursuit of excellence: from hotels to hospitals.
    Schulze HH, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan;12(1):17-8
  • “If you don’t understand how to optimize service for your customers, all the medical knowledge in the world will not be sufficient for your business to succeed.”
    The pursuit of excellence: from hotels to hospitals.
    Schulze HH, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan;12(1):17-8
  • “In my experience, there are 3 things customers expect from any business: (1) timely service, (2) a good product, and (3) people who treat me well and are nice to me (ie, caring service).”
    The pursuit of excellence: from hotels to hospitals.
    Schulze HH, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan;12(1):17-8
  • “Let’s assume for a moment that your department and institution have a good product—you are great physicians and nurses, and patients can expect good outcomes if they choose your hospital. Unfortunately, the general public may not always have enough medical knowledge to recognize that you’re doing a good job—it is timely service and the way in which people interact with them that come to define their perceptions of you and their care.”
    The pursuit of excellence: from hotels to hospitals.
    Schulze HH, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan;12(1):17-8
  • We’ve found that a wait any longer than a couple of minutes is enough to create a negative perception of your organization in the customer’s mind. Unfortunately, long wait times seem to be common at many hospitals. Why? The last people who should be kept waiting are sick patients, who are scared and anxious.
    The pursuit of excellence: from hotels to hospitals.
    Schulze HH, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan;12(1):17-8
  • “How do you create an environ- ment in which our customers are given timely, satisfactory, and courteous service? You have to hire the right people and give them a chance to work in an environment of belonging and purpose.”
    The pursuit of excellence: from hotels to hospitals.
    Schulze HH, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan;12(1):17-8
  • “I hire my employees as human beings to join us and be apart of us. I want them to be a part of the vision and dream of our company, and I want them to gain happiness from being part of a team that creates excellence.”
    The pursuit of excellence: from hotels to hospitals.
    Schulze HH, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan;12(1):17-8
  • “Just as important, I have discovered over the years that the success of the team and individual employees is highly contingent on having your organization filled with leaders rather than managers. Leaders give no excuses—they exude positivity, optimism, and drive, and that filters down to every member of the organization. Managers, on the other hand, are concerned with covering up their own lack of drive and ambition with excuses.”
    The pursuit of excellence: from hotels to hospitals.
    Schulze HH, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan;12(1):17-8
  • “Finding leaders is not that easy, but I have managed to gradually fill up my organization with leaders, rather than managers, and that has contributed toward my employees’ being happy and being placed in positions where they can succeed. Hiring the right people is the key to success and should be a top priority.”
    The pursuit of excellence: from hotels to hospitals.
    Schulze HH, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP.
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan;12(1):17-8
  • “The health care industry has recognized the importance of the patient experience. We believe that the biggest driver of patient experience is medical staff experience. If we want to increase patient experience, we must first improve the experience of the medical staff and providers.”


    Transforming the Health Care Experience: Doctors, Nurses, Patients, and Beyond
Trina Spear, Karen M. Horton, Elliot K. Fishman, Pamela T. Johnson, 
Journal of the American College of Radiology (in press)

  • “What we found through our work with hospitals around the country is that when patients walk into a hospital where each department is color coded by group, the hospital logo is embroidered on every top, and all the scrubs and laboratory coats are well fitted and pressed, it changes how they think about the institution. From the patients’ perspective, they trust the doctors and nurses, and their opinions of the providers’ performance improve exponentially.”

    
Transforming the Health Care Experience: Doctors, Nurses, Patients, and Beyond
Trina Spear, Karen M. Horton, Elliot K. Fishman, Pamela T. Johnson, 
Journal of the American College of Radiology (in press)

  • “Many patients are visiting your department for the first time. Their confidence in the quality of the care you deliver will be influenced by the appearance of your physicians, house staff, nurses, and technologists. Making sure the “uniform” is a quality presentation may improve patients’ perceptions of your department’s and institution’s quality. The proper dress code may have positive unintended consequences. On the other hand, if the point of contact to the providing care team is poorly dressed (ie, wrinkled or poorly fitting scrubs), patients may 
become concerned about the entire operation.”

    
Transforming the Health Care Experience: Doctors, Nurses, Patients, and Beyond
Trina Spear, Karen M. Horton, Elliot K. Fishman, Pamela T. Johnson, 
Journal of the American College of Radiology (in press)

  • “Ms Wolf ’s philosophy to make each customer feel like the most important customer is definitely applicable to our radiology practices. We are all aware of VIPs who visit the department, and we always try to make sure these individuals have an exceptional experience. Our goal should be to make sure every patient is treated with the same attention to detail. Every patient should be considered a VIP.”

    Stories From the Kitchen: Lessons for Radiology From the Restaurant Business
    Wolf C, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP
    JACR March 2015 Volume 12, Issue 3, Pages 307–308
  • “Interestingly, this is one area where your industry, in my experience, fails: several years ago, my father underwent major surgery, and I felt that the health care staff did not consider him to be the most important person in the room and were simply not listening to what he and my family had to say to them.”

    Stories From the Kitchen: Lessons for Radiology From the Restaurant Business
    Wolf C, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP
    JACR March 2015 Volume 12, Issue 3, Pages 307–308
  • “ The patient education resources on the ESR website are written at a comprehension level well above that of the average Internet viewer. The resources fail to meet the NIH and AMA guidelines that patient education material be written between the third and seventh grade levels. Recasting these resources in a simpler format would probably lead to greater comprehension by ESR website viewers.”

    Health literacy and online educational resources: an opportunity to educate patients.
    Hansberry DR, Agarwal N, Baker SR.
    AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2015 Jan;204(1):111-6.
  • “Inasmuch as well-educated health care professionals are designing and writing the patient education materials on many web pages, it is perhaps not surprising that the material is written at a correspondingly high grade level. This appears to be the case for resources written for patients interested in diagnostic and interventional radiology. The ESR web page devoted to patient education is written at a level too complex for the general public, particularly persons with low health literacy, to fully use. If this material were rewritten in a simpler narrative, the general readership that would benefit from the material would likely increase.”

    Health literacy and online educational resources: an opportunity to educate patients.
    Hansberry DR, Agarwal N, Baker SR.
    AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2015 Jan;204(1):111-6.
  • “Patients may accrue a greater benefit from written articles available on RadiologyInfo.org if the texts were revised to be in compliance with the National Institutes of Health and American Medical Association grade level recommendations. This could lead to a broadened appreciation of the capabilities of radiology's role in general and enhanced understanding of imaging techniques and their application to clinical practice.”

    A critical review of the readability of online patient education resources from RadiologyInfo.Org.
    Hansberry DR et al
    AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2014 Mar;202(3):566-75. 
  • “The patient education resources on these Web sites fail to meet the guidelines of the National Institutes of Health and American Medical Association. Members of the public may fail to fully understand these resources and would benefit from revisions that result in more comprehensible information cast in simpler language.”

    Are we effectively informing patients? A quantitative analysis of on-line patient education resources from the american society of neuroradiology.
    Hansberry DR1, Agarwal N, Gonzales SF, Baker SR
    AJNR Am J Neuroradiol. 2014 Jul;35(7):1270-5
  • “Although this is an improvement over the 2007 level, it is above the average national reading comprehension level. The readability of patient education materials on the AAOS website still exceeds the average reading ability of a US adult.”

    Critical review of patient education materials from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons.
    Feghhi DP, Agarwal N, Hansberry DR, Berberian WS, Sabharwal S.Am J Orthop. 2014 Aug;43(8):E168-74.
  • “Structured reporting of pancreatic multiphasic CT provided superior evaluation of pancreatic cancer and facilitated surgical planning. Surgeons were more confident regarding decisions about tumor resectability when they reviewed structured reports before review of multiphasic CT images.”

    Structured Reporting of Multiphasic CT for Pancreatic Cancer: Potential Effect on Staging and Surgical Planning.
    Brook OR et al
    Radiology. 2015 Feb;274(2):464-72
  • “When surgeons reviewed reports in combination with multiphasic CT images, they were more likely to convert an answer of "unsure" regarding resectability to a definitive answer (ie, resectable or unresectable) when the reports were structured than when they were nonstructured.”

    Structured Reporting of Multiphasic CT for Pancreatic Cancer: Potential Effect on Staging and Surgical Planning.
    Brook OR et al
    Radiology. 2015 Feb;274(2):464-72
  • “Forty-eight (40%) structured and 72 (60%) nonstructured multiphasic CT reports were reviewed. Nonstructured reports contained a mean ± standard deviation of 7.3 key features ± 2.1 (range, 1-11) and structured reports contained 10.6 ± 0.9 (range, 9-12) features (P < .001). Information for surgical planning was deemed easily accessible in 94%, 60%, and 98% of structured and 47%, 54%, and 32% of nonstructured reports by the three surgeons, respectively (P < .001, .79, < .001). Surgeons had sufficient information for surgical planning in 96%, 69%, and 98% of structured and 31%, 43%, and 25% of nonstructured reports (P < .001, .009, and < .001).”

    Structured Reporting of Multiphasic CT for Pancreatic Cancer: Potential Effect on Staging and Surgical Planning.
    Brook OR et al
    Radiology. 2015 Feb;274(2):464-72
  • “Forty-eight (40%) structured and 72 (60%) nonstructured multiphasic CT reports were reviewed. Nonstructured reports contained a mean ± standard deviation of 7.3 key features ± 2.1 (range, 1-11) and structured reports contained 10.6 ± 0.9 (range, 9-12) features (P < .001). Information for surgical planning was deemed easily accessible in 94%, 60%, and 98% of structured and 47%, 54%, and 32% of nonstructured reports by the three surgeons, respectively (P < .001, .79, < .001).”

    Structured Reporting of Multiphasic CT for Pancreatic Cancer: Potential Effect on Staging and Surgical Planning.
    Brook OR et al
    Radiology. 2015 Feb;274(2):464-72
  • “All networked medical equipment in a radiology department was scanned for vulnerabilities with a port scanner and a network vulnerability scanner, and the vulnerabilities were classified using the Common Vulnerability Scoring System. A network sniffer was used to capture and analyze traffic on the radiology network for exposure of confidential patient data. We reviewed the use of antivirus software and firewalls on the networked medical equipment. USB ports and CD and DVD drives in the networked medical equipment were tested to see whether they allowed unauthorized access. Implementation of the virtual private network (VPN) that vendors use to access the radiology network was reviewed.”

    Lack of security of networked medical equipment in radiology.
    Moses V, Korah I.
    AJR Am J Roentgenol. 2015 Feb;204(2):343-53
  • “Your department may be composed of some of the best physicians in the world, and you may know more about medicine than some of your competitors, but that doesn’t necessarily matter. If you don’t understand how to optimize service for your customers, all the medical knowledge in the world will not be sufficient for your business to succeed.”
    The Pursuit of Excellence: From Hotels to Hospitals
    Schulze HH, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan;12(1):17-8 
  • “How do you create an environment in which our customers are given timely, satisfactory, and courteous service? You have to hire the right people and give them a chance to work in an environment of belonging and purpose.”
    The Pursuit of Excellence: From Hotels to Hospitals
    Schulze HH, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan;12(1):17-8 
  • “Many people hire employees by saying that each employee was brought in to fulfill a certain “purpose.” I can think of no more dehumanizing and immoral statement than this, as it reduces the employee to the status of a machine or automaton. I hire my employees as human beings to join us and be a part of us. I want them to be a part of the vision and dream of our company, and I want them to gain happiness from being part of a team that creates excellence.”
    The Pursuit of Excellence: From Hotels to Hospitals
    Schulze HH, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan;12(1):17-8 
  • “ Leaders give no excuses—they exude positivity, optimism, and drive, and that filters down to every member of the organization. Managers, on the other hand, are concerned with covering up their own lack of drive and ambition with excuses.”
    The Pursuit of Excellence: From Hotels to Hospitals
    Schulze HH, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan;12(1):17-8 
  • “Patients do not typically have a good sense whether the care you are providing is excellent or average; their opinion of your business, and the consequent financial success of your health care enterprise, is much more contingent on their experience with you and your staff and the physical appearance of the health care environment.”
    The Pursuit of Excellence: From Hotels to Hospitals
    Schulze HH, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan;12(1):17-8 
  • “However, radiologists must become cognizant that we are, in fact, running businesses and that the long-term success of those businesses might be helped by introducing ourselves to the patients in the waiting room, being friendly (and available) if patients call our facilities with doubts about their procedures or with questions about what their radiology reports mean, and if we actually take the time to talk with and introduce ourselves to patients before their procedures.”
    The Pursuit of Excellence: From Hotels to Hospitals
    Schulze HH, Fishman EK, Horton KM, Raman SP
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan;12(1):17-8 
  • “ The patient experience advisory series has just concluded its first season at Johns Hopkins, and we have had 7 incredible speakers visit Hopkins and give us their perspectives, including Bill Phillips, the editor-in-chief of Men’s Health; Paul Greenberg, former CEO of College Humor Media; Cindy Wolf, executive chef and Baltimore restaurateur; Eric Becker, senior managing director of Sterling Partners; Whitney Fishman, senior director for innovation and consumer technology at MEC; Ed Catmull, president of Walt Disney and Pixar animation studios; and Horst Schulze, chairman and CEO of the Capella Hotel group.”
     Introduction to rethinking the patient experience.
    Raman SP, Horton KM, Fishman EK
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan;12(1):16 
  • “After all, although we like to think that medicine is somehow completely unique and different from other fields, we are fundamentally running a service industry that shares many features with other consumer-focused industries.”
    Introduction to rethinking the patient experience.
    Raman SP, Horton KM, Fishman EK
    J Am Coll Radiol. 2015 Jan;12(1):16
  • “To assess current practice of United Kingdom cardiologists with respect to patients with reported shellfish/iodine allergy, and in particular the use of iodinated contrast for elective coronary angiography. Moreover we have reviewed the current evidence-base and guidelines available in this area.”
    Shellfish allergy and relation to iodinated contrast media: United Kingdom survey.
    World J Cardio
    l. 2014 Mar 26;6(3):107-11
    Baig M et al.
  • “Amongst the respondents, 66% routinely asked about a previous history of shellfish/iodine allergy. Fifty-six percent would pre-treat these patients with steroids and anti-histamines. The other 44% do nothing, or do nonspecific testing based on their personal experience as following: (1) Skin test with 1 mL of subcutaneous contrast before intravenous contrast; (2) Test dose 2 mL contrast before coronary injection; (3) Close observation for shellfish allergy patients; and (4) Minimal evidence that the steroid and anti-histamine regime is effective but it makes us feel better.”
    Shellfish allergy and relation to iodinated contrast media: United Kingdom survey.
    World J Cardiol. 2014 Mar 26;6(3):107-11
    Baig M et al.
  • “There is no evidence that allergy to shellfish alters the risk of reaction to intravenous contrast more than any other allergy and asking about such allergies in pre-angiogram assessment will not provide any additional information except propagating the myth.”
    Shellfish allergy and relation to iodinated contrast media: United Kingdom survey.
    World J Cardiol. 2014 Mar 26;6(3):107-11
    Baig M et al.
  • “Patients in our study wanted their results communicated much sooner than is currently practiced. Optimizing patient satisfaction may require a new communication model.”
    Creating a Patient-Centered Imaging Service: Determining What Patients Want
    Basu PA,Ruiz-Wibbelsmann JA, Spielman SB, Dalsem VFV, Rosenberg JK, Glazer GM
    AJR 2011; 196:605–610
  • “Despite these limitations, our study indicates that patients want their imaging results within a few hours and do not show an overwhelming preference as to which physician communicates their results. This finding suggests that radiologists have an important opportunity to change the current practice mode and fulfill their role as clinicians who are important members of the patient’s health care team.”
    Creating a Patient-Centered Imaging Service: Determining What Patients Want
    Basu PA,Ruiz-Wibbelsmann JA, Spielman SB, Dalsem VFV, Rosenberg JK, Glazer GM
    AJR 2011; 196:605–610
  • “The strong preference of patients to receive their CT and MRI results promptly should ultimately help erode cultural, historical, and operational barriers to direct communication between the radiologist and the patient.”
    Creating a Patient-Centered Imaging Service: Determining What Patients Want
    Basu PA,Ruiz-Wibbelsmann JA, Spielman SB, Dalsem VFV, Rosenberg JK, Glazer GM
    AJR 2011; 196:605–610
  • “ A 2008 national survey by the American College of Radiology revealed that one in two Americans still does not know “whether a radiologist is a person who interprets or a person who administers the scan”.”
    The Invisible Radiologist
    Glazer GM, Ruiz-Wibbelsmann JA
    Radiology 2011; 258:18-22
  • “Today, some claim that our discipline is being commoditized by the growth of teleradiology and pic- ture archiving and communication sys- tems, which have enabled the remote interpretation of images by an invisible radiologist isolated from patients.”
    The Invisible Radiologist
    Glazer GM, Ruiz-Wibbelsmann JA
    Radiology 2011; 258:18-22
  • “In the mean- time, there are small steps radiologists can take to accomplish this goal, such as introducing themselves to patients, explaining imaging examination proce- dures, creating patient-friendly imaging reports, and designing radiologic facili- ties that promote comfortable doctor- patient interactions.”
    The Invisible Radiologist
    Glazer GM, Ruiz-Wibbelsmann JA
    Radiology 2011; 258:18-22
  • “However, the invisibility of radiologists perpetuates the misperception that many imaging services are commodities. By offering an even higher level of personalized service through direct communication, radiologists can dispel this viewpoint by showing patients that they customize imaging examinations to fit each patient’s individual health care needs.”
    The Invisible Radiologist
    Glazer GM, Ruiz-Wibbelsmann JA
    Radiology 2011; 258:18-22
  • “ We need to put ourselves in the patients place, looking at Radiology and the work of radiologists from the patient’s point of view.”
    Empathy’s Vital Role in Putting Patients First
    Gunderman RB, Tillack AA
    Radiology 2013;269:315-317
  • “Putting patients first means stepping outside of a strictly industrial and technical paradigm, looking at each patients care from the patient’s perspective, and letting the patient know that we care.”
    Empathy’s Vital Role in Putting Patients First
    Gunderman RB, Tillack AA
    Radiology 2013;269:315-317
  • “ An industrial or assembly line model of radiology practice is unlikely to achieve a sufficient degree of empathy. Such a model inevitably puts parameters such as efficiency first, and efficiency dictates that, insofar as possible, every patient should be shuttled through the system much like every other, maximizing throughput and minimizing costs.”
    Empathy’s Vital Role in Putting Patients First
    Gunderman RB, Tillack AA
    Radiology 2013;269:315-317
© 1999-2018 Elliot K. Fishman, MD, FACR. All rights reserved.